Food Pouches for Babies and Toddlers

I have been meaning to write about this topic for some time, as I see more and more toddlers just sucking food from commercial food  or refillable pouches.

Undoubtedly, when baby weaning foods  in pouches were introduced many years ago, it revolutionized feeding infants. These pouches were not only better for the environment, but they were lighter, easy to travel with and looked kinda cool. What has suprised many of us working in paediatrics however, is how baby food in pouches has changed the way children are being fed. Suddenly a spoon was not required anymore, because the baby could just suck it directly from the pouch and parents were happy that it did not cause any mess. We now even have companies making refillable pouches and their clever advertising feeds into our aversion with mess.

It seems to be forgotten that there are essential developmental steps that need to occur for a baby/toddler to learn how to eat and allows them to have a normal relationship with food. Sucking, is a reflex a baby gets born with, so this is something that they know how to do, but chewing is something they need to learn and letting a baby/toddler just suck out of a pouch certainly does not help teach them this skill. In addition to this, there are important fine motor skills like holding a spoon and bringing this to the mouth that are important.  Outside of the mechanical side of eating, eating is a sensory experience. When the food is sucked from the pouch, they do not see how the food looks, what it smells like and they just feel the texture. No wonder they then refuse home cooked food when it comes in a plate – because they used to sucking it from a pouch.

Mess is such a crucial part of getting used to foods, accepting flavours, textures and tastes. The most common therapeutic advice we give in children with feeding difficulties is to allow mess, let them play with textures and allow them to explore foods. Letting a child suck from a pouch means, we are side-stepping this very important developmental step and it can actually lead to a feeding difficulty later.

Of course, there are exceptions which I always discuss with parents – you are stuck on a plane, in a car or visiting friends with a white sofa, so in these circumstance by all means allow them to suck from the pouch, but this should not be the norm. Let them explore food in all its colour, texture and taste.

 

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Nutritious Cauliflower and Seed Falafel Recipe

I made this recipe over the weekend because I did not believe it could work, but was amazed at how delicious it was….and yes it works. This recipe is milk, egg, soya and gluten free, but its not suitable for seed allergy sufferers.

Ingredients:

50 g pumpkin seeds

40g sunflower seeds

1 table spoon linseed

350 g cauliflower (take a young and fresh cauliflower, as you do not want one that tastes bitter)

1 teaspoon of ground cumin

1 teaspoon of ground coriander

70 g Tahini paste

1 1/2 teaspoon Xantham gum (This helps it stick together)

30 ml Lemon juice

30 ml water (I used a little bit less as it depends on how the consistency of the mixture feels)

Handful chopped coriander and parsley

Salt and pepper to taste

 

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Method:

  1. Roast the seeds for 2 minutes in a pan
  2. Blend the seeds, cauliflower, tahini, herbs and spices all together and add the Xantham gum powder, lemon juice and water
  3. Roll in falafel balls or any other shape you like and fry in oil at 160 C until crispy.20160416_130839[1]

 

 

 

Tastes, textures and colours during weaning

Eating for us and for babies is a sensory experience, which is often forgotten. I frequently hear that a food is rejected because of the taste, but it could actually be the texture, the temperature, the colour of the food and also the environment that leads to rejection. It is therefore important to take this into account when you feed your baby.

There is a “window of opportunity” when babies are more open to new tastes and textures, which is usually from (5)6-10 months. During this period, they will be open to trial new foods. It is therefore important when you start with weaning foods, to constantly introduce new foods and from 6 months on start introducing texture. Try to also change the temperature, that your baby is used to eating foods that are hot or cold. This may become very  useful, for those days when you are out and about and can not heat the food up to the perfect temperature. Most babies will prefer sweet foods; as such you should not be disheartened if they do not like your green bean and broccoli mixture the first time you give it to them. It is important to repeat these foods and repeat them a lot…..it takes at least 15 x before some rejected foods are accepted.

When it comes to textures, whether you follow the baby led weaning approach or the traditional approach, texture is important and by 10 months ideally children should have a good variety of foods they can feed themselves by hand. Of course you are not expecting them to spoon feed at this age! Finger feeding is a messy affair, but good to let them explore and mess as this is not only a way for them to discover textures but also to enjoy the meal and feel independent.

Remember that babies look at colour as well and often choose their foods on how they look. “Mush” may therefore not always be as attractive as the food on your plate (which they may try to grab), which is colourful and plated out separately. So if they reject their mix, do try finger foods separately.

Finally, it’s a myth that babies like bland food.  Of course that does not mean you are going to add salt to the food, but there is no reason for you to not use garlic, onion, basil, rosemary and all kinds of exiting herbs and spices. I often get parents that are surprised that their child likds olives or enjoyed some curry from their plate, but this is normal, depending on the mother’s diet they would have been exposed to flavours in the womb and through breast milk. Therefore, be adventurous and add herbs and spices that are normally part of your diet to their food.

Most importantly, let your baby enjoy meal times!