Sugar Free Baby-Toddler Biscuits

One of the most common questions I get from parents is about treats for their baby. The truth is that treats are driven more by us as adults than a need by the child – but by starting them, there is an expectation to continue. For me a treat is a birthday party and special occasions, but not a daily occasion. This brings me to the question about biscuits. In the UK I find a lot of nurseries and schools still provide quite sugary biscuits (and even cakes) as snacks. It is really beyond me, why this can not be changed to just fruit/fresh vegetables. In any case, I therefore set myself a challenge to work on a biscuit recipe that parents could use from 8 months of age. The reason I put 8 months is just to ensure that the baby has got the oral motor skills to manage it, so if your child is one of the more advanced baby lead “weaners”, then this could be consumed earlier, on the other hand, if your child’s oral motor skills are not quite there, then you may need to wait. Also note, this biscuit is NOT supposed to be sweet like the biscuits we eat, it just has the tinge of sweetness from the fruit added.

Ingredients:

  1. 1 cup of flour (you can easily use 1/2 cup of flour + 1/2 cup of nut flour if you are introducing nuts early as per new guidelines – speak to your healthcare professional)
  2. 50 g of butter (I use unsalted butter)
  3. 1/4 of a grated apple – this is where it becomes exiting, I just grated apple using a very fine grate (with the skin), but you could use pear, mashed banana and many other fruit. Depending on the moisture content of the fruit you may need to grate more or sometimes less
  4. 2 Tables spoons of skimmed milk powder
  5. Tip of a knife of vanilla powder – you can replace this with cinnamon or other spices that your toddler may like

 

Method:

  1. Heat oven to 180C
  2. Rub cold butter into flour mixture
  3. Grate in fruit – start with a small amount and feel with your fingers the density of the dough, it needs to end up like a pastry density
  4. Add the vanilla or other spices
  5. Leave in fridge for 30 min
  6. Roll in small finger sized biscuits (so that your to Toddler can hold them)
  7. Bake for 15 min – they keep for a good 2 weeks in a tinIMG_2643

What do I need to do if I suspect my child has a cow’s milk allergy?

Last week I wrote a blog on cow’s milk allergy, which I had quite a bit of response on. I thought it is useful to follow this up as promised with a blog entry on what to do if you suspect your child has cow’s milk allergy. First of all, please do NOT remove cow’s milk out of your child’s diet without consulting with your doctor to establish whether there are other causes for the symptoms that your child is exhibiting. If a cow’s milk allergy is suspected an elimination diet of cow’s milk may be recommend to see if the symptoms improve.  This should ideally be done under the supervision of a dietitian. I know that I often get complaints that some of you do not have dietitians in your areas or that there is a long waiting list to see one. It is worth the wait as cow’s milk provides a lot of essential nutrient especially if in the young. The British Dietetic Association has some Fact Sheets that have been put together by the Food Allergy Specialist Group, that provide information, but they do not replace an individualised dietetic appointment.

I wanted to broadly discuss general treatment models for cow’s milk allergy. If you are breastfeeding your baby, please continue breastfeeding and get advice on how to optimally take out cow’s milk out of your diet without compromising your nutritional status and reducing breast milk quality. It is highly likely that a calcium and vitamin D supplement will be required. In some cases your doctor/dietitian may recommend that you remove not only cow’s milk but soya and other food allergens. Again, this should NOT occur unsupervised.

If your child is not on breast milk, but on formula milk you will be recommended a hypoallergenic formula. You get two types, an extensively hydrolysed formula and an amino acid formula. The majority of children with have full symptom improvement on an extensively hydrolysed formula, which is made from short chain peptide (cow’s milk protein chopped up in smaller building blocks) that your child’s body will not recognise as an allergen. In a small number of children an amino acid formula is required. These are formulas that contain amino acids only, the smallest building blocks of protein.

Its important to note that these formulas taste different, smell different and yes, will lead to your child’s stools to look different – dark green in the majority of cases. If they spit up, the smell of this will also be different and it will have a different texture. This is absolutely normal and related to the fact that these milks have smaller pieces of protein or amino acids.

Whilst writing on hypoallergenic formulas, its crucial that parents also understand that any milk from animals on 4 legs (goat, sheep, buffalo, donkey) should be avoided as the protein is very similar and over the counter milks like for example oat, quinoa and coconut milk should only be offered after 1 year of age and ideally after a review by a dietitian. You can though use them in cooking from 6 months of age.

I would like to finish off this blog entry by saying that what I have written above does not replace professional advice cow’s milk allergy and nutritional management. Advice is ideally tailored for the individual.