Size of a child as trigger of feeding difficulties

I promised last week that I would expand on each trigger of feeding difficulties. I will start with size – or growth of a child, which next to texture transitioning is one of the biggest causes of feeding difficulties.

First of all, it is important to get your child’s growth assessed on a regular basis. I want to define what is growth, because most people just think of weight, but in fact growth encompasses weight, length/height growth and in a child < 2 years of age head circumference. You can not assess how a child is growing only by looking at their weight, because the length of a child gives you important long term information on growth and so does a head circumference in the young. For example if your child’s weight has dropped a centile but the height is continues to grow well, then this is  much less worrying as your child may come from a taller skinnier family and this is genetically normal for your child. So if there is one message that comes out from today’s blog entry, is to get a length/height and head circumference (< 2 years of age) done before you start worrying that your child is not growing.

Now, why is growth a trigger for feeding difficulties? Usually if somebody tells a parent that their child is not growing it hits a very sensitive nerve that goes to the core of parenting. No parent can be blamed for not taking this personally! The knee-jerk reaction is to immediately start correcting this by feeding more food and increasing the frequency of feeding intervals. It makes sense that more food equals more energy and protein intake which means growth. However, your child may not want to have more and eat more frequently, which then leads to them refusing food, the parents becoming more distressed as they worry about their growth and the more distressed they are the harder they try, the more the child refuses……so you can see a cycle of feeding difficulties starting.

I would like to give some simple tips, but this does not replace professional advice.

  1. Enrich the food that your child is currently eating happily with cheese, cream, pureed lentils and other energy and protein rich foods. Ensure that you give full cream yogurt, provide a spoon of nut butter in the porridge your child is having or make a fruit smoothie with yoghurt and almond butter for example. Gaining weight is not just about energy but protein as well, so adding just oil is not going to do the trick.
  2. Do not increase sweets and chocolates – these are empty calories and do not contribute hugely to catch up growth. Food increases catch up growth which is more balanced and also for the future better for your child.
  3. Ensure that your child has sufficient vitamins and minerals which are co-factors for growth. This means, your body needs them to metabolise the energy they are consuming.
  4. Keep meal times to 30 min and no longer than this!
  5. Offer a manageable portion – this is psychologically important for parent and child
  6. If the can self feed – ensure that they have foods that are higher in energy and protein that they can self fed – cheese strips, falafel, home-made chicken strips, bread sticks and hummus, avocado and oat cakes as snack ect. This is often more successful.
  7. Respect your child’s signals of hunger and satiety – if they signal they are full, stop feeding
  8. Never force feed or feed when they are unhappy and crying

 

Advertisements

Feeding difficulties in Children

Every week I see children with feeding difficulties of varying degree in my clinic. What I can tell parents is that it is common, you are not abnormal and that it is very difficult dealing with a child that does not want to eat. I do want to focus a couple of blog entries over the next weeks on this topic, as I think there are some simple tips that may help and most importantly its you as parents want to know when do you need to see a healthcare professional.

Lets start with what are feeding difficulties.Generally if a child has one (or a combination) of the below they are classified as having feeding difficulties

  • extended mealtimes (if they take > 30 min)
  • sealing of the mouth/pushing food away
  • gagging on solids
  • spitting food out – every meal and all foods
  • dream feeding – so refusing to feed from the bottle if awake and only taking it whilst asleep

There is a lovely acronym summarising all triggers for developing feeding difficulties and it is called “STOMP”.

S – Size: the natural response to a child not achieving optimal growth is to try harder, to feed more, increase volume or frequency of foods and all of this leads to an increase in stress in mealtimes and as a result feeding becomes something your child (and you) want to avoid.

T – Transitioning: transitioning from breast to bottle, from puree to textured foods can can also lead to problems. For example the first time you provide some lumpier textures your child gags (which normally looks like they are choking but is not that bad), you get a fright and as a result do not move on with textures. If textured foods are not introduced by 10 months of age, it becomes very difficult as a critical window of opportunity has been missed.

O – Organic disease: there are many medical reasons why a child does not want to feed. That may be related to an anatomical problem with swallow/stomach, reflux or food allergies. It is therefore important to ensure that medical causes are ruled out. I will in a future blog highlight exactly the medical “red flag sign” that should not be ignored with feeding difficulties.

M- mechanistic feeding: the most common question from parents is that they want an exact schedule (including timing) for when their child should have a bottle, when they should have a snack and meal. So meal times become “mechanistic” rather than responsive to your child’s needs. Feeding a child or lets say trying to feed a child when they are not hungry but just according to the clock may also feed into the development of a feeding difficulty.

P – post traumatic: this can happen for example with a severe allergic reaction. For example your child had some egg, started swelling up in the mouth, was rushed to the emergency room and as a result is not only refusing egg but any foods that have a texture like egg. Another example is chocking (and I mean really choking) on food, which is very frightening for parents and the child and can put children off having pieces in future because they are scared of choking.

I will write next week on who size can impact on feeding difficulties and what you can do

 

 

The issue about salt in children

The question about salt comes up very frequently from parents I talk to, in particular if babies are above 1 year of age. Before 1 year, everybody has accepted that a “no salt policy” is a good one for baby food, but somehow there is this thinking that something magical happens at the age of one and suddenly salt intake can be totally liberalised. Of course kidneys mature with age and the amount of salt tolerated increases, but the idea behind the guidelines for reducing salt intake is also to raise a new generation of adults that are not as salt dependent as many of us are and therefore become healthier adults.

It is well known in adults that excessive salt intake affects blood pressure, but new research has shown that high salt intake in children may predispose children to high blood pressure, osteoporosis, respiratory illness (i.e. asthma), stomach cancer and obesity. So how much can your child have? The following are recommended intakes for the UK, but other EU countries have similar guidelines.

0-6 month: < 1 g per day

6-12 months: 1 g/day

1-3 years: 2 g/day

4-6 years: 3 g/day

7-10 year: 5 g/day

11 years and above: 6 g/day (adult requirements)

 Simple tips for reducing salt in your toddler’s diet:

  • Do not add salt to food – you can use herbs, spices and garlic/onion to make the food really yummy
  • Be careful of adult type crisp/salty crackers
  • Be careful of sauces/stock – you can find baby stock that does not have salt added and even better make your own
  • Smoked salmon, ham, cheese, bacon and many sausages contain a lot of salt, so best to keep the intake limited of these foods
  • You can also find a lot of salt in bread, snack and even breakfast cereals – food companies in the UK have really improved, but its important to be aware of hidden sources

How to read labels?

Firstly you need to know how to convert salt to sodium and visa versa, as many of the labels use sodium rather than salt.

<!–

Salt = sodium x 2.5 – so if something contains 2.4g of sodium, it means it contains 6 g of salt. Be careful as often sodium is put in mg, so 2400 mg of sodium = 6 g of salt. Let me give you some further examples: if a product per 100 g contains 300 mg of sodium, this is 0.3g sodium x 2.5 = 0.75g of salt or if the product contains 0.2 g of sodium = 0.5g of salt. Hope this makes sense.

Many products now use a traffic light system to indicate salt content and are provided per 100g portion of the specific food.

<!–

  • High is more than 1.5g salt (0.6g sodium) per 100g. These foods may be colour-coded red.
  • Medium is between 0.3 (0.1 sodium) and 1.5 g (0.6 g sodium) salt per 100g. These foods may be colour-coded in amber
  • Low is 0.3g salt (0.1g sodium) or less per 100g. These foods may be colour-coded green.

 

Useful Sites/leaflets

NHS Live Well Salt Guideline

You will see that the UK has published  2017 salt reduction targets for foods like ham, bread and other general products, which should help all of us in the future. You can read them here.